Gathering 2024 Speakers

 

 

Gina and Dan Guiboche

Gina Guiboche

Gina Guiboche is Canadian, specifically Muskego Ininiwak (Swampy Cree People) from Opaskwayak Cree Nation in northern Manitoba and Vuntut Gwich’in (Dene People of the Lakes) from Old Crow, YK Canada. She belongs to the matrilineal Wolf clan of Old Crow. She is married to Daniel, and they have four children and five grandchildren.

Gina is an educator and currently serves as Dean of Kenanow Faculty of Education at University College of the North in The Pas, Manitoba and has held administrative positions throughout her career. She holds a MSc in Marriage & Family Therapy through Loma Linda University.

Gina is a first-generation survivor as both her parents’ attended government enforced residential school. She understands firsthand the difficulties that Indigenous people face due to this dark legacy and long-term affects. She is passionate for people to understand colonization, residential schools and how it has turned away Indigenous from wanting to know about Jesus.

Gina is a member of Indigenous Ministries, a department of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Canada. We seek to bring the truth and Good News of Jesus to all Indigenous of North America in the way it should have been taught to our people—with respect, care, and true Christian love.

 

Daniel Guiboche

Daniel Guiboche has been retired from the Pastoral ministry since September 1, 2020. He started pastoring in 1994 and worked for the Man/Sask Conference from 1994 to 2015. Dan pastored in The Pas/OCN and Hudson Bay Sk, Swan River and Winnipegosis districts.  He also pastored in Prince Albert Sk for 2 years before accepting a call to the Alberta Conference to be the chaplain for the Mamawi Atosketan Native School from 2016 to 2020.   Dan and his wife Gina have been married for 38 years and we have four children, Tyson, Tannis, Danette and Daniel J. Since retiring, Dan has been busy doing funerals drawing on his experience as a chaplain.


                                              

 

                             

Valoaga Siatunuu

Valoaga Siatunu’u was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, and is of Samoan descent. He serves as the pastor of the Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw Seventh-day Adventist Church in Port Hardy, British Columbia, Canada, and is also the coordinator for Indigenous Ministries B.C. Valoaga and his beautiful wife and partner in ministry, Sheryl Siatunu’u, have six children and four grandchildren. His passion is to serve the Lord faithfully, holding regular Bible studies on prophecy, the sanctuary, and character transformation through the love of Christ in preparation for the soon return of our Lord.

Dr. Campbell Page is Cree and Red River Métis and is the Indigenous Ministries Director for the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Canada (SDACC).  He has designed the website imsdacc.com.  These are his words, “Our lives are stories. Our lives are stories that intersect other lives and stories.
Each life, each story of eternal significance.  Our stories matter.  Where we are from, the land, the people, our experiences, our cultures our languages. Where we are going. It all matters.  It helps us know who we are and often gives us a purpose for where we are going.   It is when we forget how the Creator has led us and our ancestors in past days that we lose site of our stories, our purpose, and where the Creator wants us to travel today and in the future.

I am Cree. I am also Métis. My Cree (maternal) and Métis (paternal) Oji-Cree ancestors regularly looked on skies like this from the southern James Bay areas near Moose Factory, and Central Manitoba, Northwestern Ontario, respectively, for thousands of years pre-contact. Some of my Orkney ancestors first touched this land in the Moose and York Factory areas. Called Turtle Island by many First Peoples, and Rupert's Land by the newcomers. It is clear why they so quickly fell in love with the land and the people. They learned to live within the diversity of different nations and cultures sharing a land with enough for all.
Other ancestors came over a hundred years later. Seeking a fresh start in a country of promise. Already much had changed. A country had been created. Treaties broken. Lives and Peoples gone forever. The promise of mutual responsibility and blessings that had begun with first contact laying in tatters.
One hundred years later I stand with one foot planted firmly with my ancestors who have walked this land for thousands of years; while the other is situated with my European settler ancestors and the pain and destruction that they have been a part of here in Canada. 
One part of my story involves ancestors surviving residential and day schools, and some not, and the 1870 and 1885 Resistances, the Reign of Terror after 1870, and then hiding, themselves and their families, from further pain and persecution. Becoming "invisible Indians" in their own country to protect me. And on the other side of my ancestors, good people as well, most completely unaware of what has been taking place, living with their white privilege.
 
As I said, a foot planted in both worlds. For some, an uncomfortable place to be. Yet, doesn't the Creator form and bring people to the places he needs them?

I am Cree. I am Métis. I have a special place between the two worlds. A place of responsibility to both. A place of opportunity for both. Serving and learning from the Creator has taken up the focus of most of my adult life. I am a student of life, a teacher, a multi-faith/multicultural spiritual care practitioner, a Registered Psychotherapist, and most importantly, a child of the Creator.  This is me.  As a Cree, as a Métis, and a believer my responsibility is to serve my Creator and all my relations. “
                                                                                                      Miigwech (Thank you)
                                                                                          			Campbell Page
Dr. Campbell Page is Cree and Red River Métis and is the Indigenous Ministries Director for the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Canada (SDACC). He has designed the website imsdacc.com. These are his words, “Our lives are stories. Our lives are stories that intersect other lives and stories. Each life, each story of eternal significance. Our stories matter. Where we are from, the land, the people, our experiences, our cultures our languages. Where we are going. It all matters. It helps us know who we are and often gives us a purpose for where we are going. It is when we forget how the Creator has led us and our ancestors in past days that we lose site of our stories, our purpose, and where the Creator wants us to travel today and in the future. I am Cree. I am also Métis. My Cree (maternal) and Métis (paternal) Oji-Cree ancestors regularly looked on skies like this from the southern James Bay areas near Moose Factory, and Central Manitoba, Northwestern Ontario, respectively, for thousands of years pre-contact. Some of my Orkney ancestors first touched this land in the Moose and York Factory areas. Called Turtle Island by many First Peoples, and Rupert's Land by the newcomers. It is clear why they so quickly fell in love with the land and the people. They learned to live within the diversity of different nations and cultures sharing a land with enough for all. Other ancestors came over a hundred years later. Seeking a fresh start in a country of promise. Already much had changed. A country had been created. Treaties broken. Lives and Peoples gone forever. The promise of mutual responsibility and blessings that had begun with first contact laying in tatters. One hundred years later I stand with one foot planted firmly with my ancestors who have walked this land for thousands of years; while the other is situated with my European settler ancestors and the pain and destruction that they have been a part of here in Canada. One part of my story involves ancestors surviving residential and day schools, and some not, and the 1870 and 1885 Resistances, the Reign of Terror after 1870, and then hiding, themselves and their families, from further pain and persecution. Becoming "invisible Indians" in their own country to protect me. And on the other side of my ancestors, good people as well, most completely unaware of what has been taking place, living with their white privilege. As I said, a foot planted in both worlds. For some, an uncomfortable place to be. Yet, doesn't the Creator form and bring people to the places he needs them? I am Cree. I am Métis. I have a special place between the two worlds. A place of responsibility to both. A place of opportunity for both. Serving and learning from the Creator has taken up the focus of most of my adult life. I am a student of life, a teacher, a multi-faith/multicultural spiritual care practitioner, a Registered Psychotherapist, and most importantly, a child of the Creator. This is me. As a Cree, as a Métis, and a believer my responsibility is to serve my Creator and all my relations. “ Miigwech (Thank you) Campbell Page

Campbell Page

 

Bev and Randy Haines

Beverley Edwards-Haines is a Nutritionist, Raw Culinary Arts Associate Chef and Instructor, television host, magazine columnist, and an organic vegetable farmer with her husband, Randy. Previously a Registered Dietitian with Interior Health, she enjoys travelling to conduct healthy lifestyle seminars and cooking classes, and is passionate about sharing with others the fantastic health benefits and culinary joys of a plant-powered way of eating. 

Randy Haines is a custom cabinet-maker, with 25 years of honing his craft. He is also highly knowledgeable and very experienced with growing vegetables. Developing and nurturing the soil to grow abundant, beautiful, chemical-free produce is his passion as an organic vegetable farmer. 

 

Hector Hill


Marcia Nahorny

Marcia is a Marriage and Family Therapist who has been in private practice for over 28 years. Her unique expertise, one that crosses and blends relational psychotherapy and nursing, brings a unique perspective and expansive range of interventions into the therapy setting. Her treatment approach is unique for every client, personalized for each individual’s style, nature of the problem, and comfort and pacing.

Marcia’s work has been described as practical, interactive, and solution-focused. Her treatment approach is to provide support and practical feedback to help clients resolve current problems and long-standing patterns in addressing physical, emotional and spiritual issues from a holistic perspective. She incorporates a blend of conventional and alternative approaches, drawing upon a variety of styles and techniques to incorporate what will be most helpful for each client. With sensitivity and compassion, she works with each client to help them build on their strengths to identify and achieve life goals.

As a graduate of Loma Linda University, and with over thirty years experience as a clinician, her areas of expertise are relationship counselling; treating children with FASD, ADHD, ODD; women’s issues; stress and anxiety management; recovery from depression; self esteem and assertiveness training; survivors of sexual/verbal/emotional trauma; recovery from addictions; and coping with grief and loss.

In her varied professional history, she has worked at a local employment centre and an opiate replacement therapy clinic. Additionally, Marcia has presented to college faculty and students and general audiences on topics ranging from stress and exam anxiety management to effective behavior modification techniques for children with behavioral and/or emotional disorders.